Thursday, March 19, 2009

Problem with 'Choruss' ... not so simple after all. The RIAA scamsters are making their pitch directly to colleges & other ISP's

I just learned that it's not so "simple" as I thought it was. Mike Masnick of TechDirt, the guy who exposed this scam, was kind enough to explain to me that "Choruss" isn't something students will be able to opt out of. Mike explains : "Ray, one of the problems with Choruss is that *users* won't have a choice. That's because it's designed for universities and ISPs to sign up *on behalf* of all of their users. So, individuals won't even get the chance to say no -- which is part of the reason why there needs to be much more focus on what it's trying to do." So I've revised what I've originally written:

There's a big controversy going on about some plan arch RIAA bad guy Warner Bros. has, which it named "Choruss", to peddle its music to college campuses. Apparently its sales pitch doesn't conform to the actual terms. See, e.g. p2pnet.net story.

Regardless of what the reality is -- and experience teaches us that what an RIAA member says is usually false -- the answer is simple: those of us who are knowledgeable about what the RIAA does to people should urge colleges, universities, and ISP's to stay far away from this product carrying the RIAA taint. And we should ask our friends to do so as well.

So if your college, university, or ISP is being offered something called "Choruss", please -- for the sake of all those who have suffered at the hands of Warner Bros. and its 3 coconspirators -- urge them to say "No, thank you."

We do not want our colleges, universities, and ISP's to become business partners of some of the most unethical corporations on the planet.

[Ed. note. It's also permissible to urge them to say "No, thank you, you SOB's." -R.B.]

Commentary & discussion:

Slashdot
p2pnet.net







Keywords: lawyer digital copyright law online internet law legal download upload peer to peer p2p file sharing filesharing music movies indie independent label freeculture creative commons pop/rock artists riaa independent mp3 cd favorite songs intellectual property portable music player

9 comments:

Mike Masnick said...

Ray, one of the problems with Choruss is that *users* won't have a choice. That's because it's designed for universities and ISPs to sign up *on behalf* of all of their users. So, individuals won't even get the chance to say no -- which is part of the reason why there needs to be much more focus on what it's trying to do.

Ray Beckerman said...

Wow, thanks for letting me know, Mike. I misunderstood.

I'm going to update my blog post to explain that.

Anonymous said...

First we attack the students via MediaSentry and the Sue-em-all campaign, than we slide in Audio-Magic, and the promise that we will no longer pursue litigation, then we dump Rhapsody and bring on Choruss. Let’s just keep screwing the students...and the Universities for every buck we can skin...

Anonymous said...

Ray, small typo: "orgiginally".

Regarding to what Mike said, universities might sign up for Choruss if it would protect their students, but if their students subsequently got sued, the universities would probably stop wasting their money.

The universities would probably bail on Choruss, unless they're either pressured by law or threat of targeted lawsuits (purely hypothetical example, the RIAA bringing 80% of its lawsuits against non-Choruss universities, e.g.).

But all of this depends on universities structuring their networks so users aren't anonymous. Even a hack economist can do the math and see that universities might want to consider logging less user information.

XYZZY

Ray Beckerman said...

Thanks for the typo correction.

They shouldn't sign up even if it does 'protect' the students. They shouldn't pay 'protection money' or extortion. They shouldn't patronize these vile companies.

Period.

Colleges and universities are supposed to stand for something.

Eric said...

Colleges generally do not stand for much these days. The vibe I have gotten from other choices our university has made in the past is there is another major reason not to sign on that has nothing to do with the RIAA.

Signing up for the service and then getting sued would then make the university a party to the lawsuit and the student would/could go after the university for their losses. Our university sticks it's neck out for very few, let alone "illegal downloads".

There is also FERPA and other statutory issues that make these sorts of "contracts" hard to make.

But I don't believe for one moment that most universities would do anything to risk getting involved with these lawsuits, and that is sad.

Not Telling said...

With all of their lousy music and mafia-like tactics, they should have called it "racket".

derivative said...

I think you meant "rackett" :)

But "choruss" works too, in context:

"Come and see my shiny choruss, my preciousss. You wants it; you needs it."

Anonymous said...

I mistyped earlier. I wrote "The universities would probably bail on Choruss, unless they're either pressured by law or threat of targeted lawsuits (purely hypothetical example, the RIAA bringing 80% of its lawsuits against non-Choruss universities, e.g.)."

But that doesn't make sense, because a university would sign up for Choruss under the agreement for its students not to be sued by the RIAA. I suppose a third party could make a deal with the RIAA and the third party could bring lawsuits against predominately non-Choruss universities.

Sorry.

XYZZY